RENEWAL is designed to offer hope and comfort to people suffering from mental health disorders or addiction disorders, and support to the people who love them. Our approach is based on respect for the dignity of the people we serve and the belief that through a faith-based program, life-changing results are possible.

RENEWAL: Christian Treatment and Recovery is an optional treatment supplement available through Brookhaven Hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma. At Brookhaven, we understand that when you are suffering from an eating disorder, a personality disorder, a behavioral health disorder or chemical dependency, life can seem utterly hopeless. It can cause Christians to feel abandoned and distant from God. However, by strengthening your spirituality, in conjunction with our professional medical services, you can experience results that you never thought were possible.

RENEWAL is based on the belief in:

God who created us and loves us (Genesis 1:26)
Jesus Christ who redeems us (Isaiah 53:5)
The Holy Spirit who guides us (Acts 1:8)

When you participate in RENEWAL, you’re part of something much bigger than yourself. Brookhaven clients receive expert care from our team of mental professionals. Treatment is solution-focused and success-oriented. Our goal is to minimize symptoms, help individuals address life problems and live fulfilling lives. Sometimes healing requires a helping hand. We’re here to provide the guidance and support you need to recover.

Christian Care
The RENEWAL program at Brookhaven Hospital incorporates your faith into the recovery process in order to address your physical, mental and spiritual needs

Christian Drug Rehab
Our program provides a nurturing atmosphere that allows you to sober up and strengthen your bond with God.

Christian Bulimia Treatment
Individuals with bulimia alternate between compulsive binge eating and purging. Without treatment bulimia can be deadly. Brookhaven’s RENEWAL program can offer medical, psychological and faith-based eating disorder treatments.

PTSD Treatment
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs after a traumatic event. Without getting proper help it can be debilitating. Strengthening your faith can help you confront the past and form a brighter future.

Christian Healing
When you are part of the RENEWAL program, you are part of something bigger than yourself. You are part of a support system based on professional medical care as well as spiritual guidance.

Compulsive Overeating
When you suffer from compulsive overeating disorder, your meals and your life can seem out of control. Take a faith-based approach to your eating disorder treatment at RENEWAL.

Anorexia Treatment
Anorexia is characterized by the restriction of food intake and the refusal to maintain a healthy body weight. Without getting help, anorexia can be life-threatening.

Bipolar Disorder Treatment
Everyone experiences ups and downs, but when you’re suffering from bipolar disorder life can seem out of control. Brookhaven’s RENEWAL program incorporates your spirituality into an advanced behavioral health program.

OCD Treatment
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) can fill your life with uncontrollable thoughts (obsessions) and rituals (compulsions) and stand in the way of relationships and your career.

Is hoarding a personal problem?

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This time of year, in light of abundant gifts, gift giving, decorating, and New Year resolutions, people are purposing to get organized. However, there are some people that find that the task of getting organized is much more difficult. According to David F. Tolin, director of the anxiety disorders center at the Institute of Living, reluctance to get organized is sometimes “a personal problem.” The fact is that excessive clutter and disorganization can be a sign of something more serious, a health problem. Often time’s people with brain injuries and certain behavioral issues have a more difficult time getting organized. In particular, behavioral issues such as depression, ADD (attention deficit disorder), grieving, and pain issues can cause a lack of desire to become organized.

Taking the idea that disorganization and clutter are symptomatic of health issues a bit further, hoarding, although not yet a recognized diagnosis, is a word used to describe chronic disorganization that interferes with a person’s quality of life. People that suffer from hoarding find it impossible and even painful to part with items they possess. The good news is that there is hope for the disorganized and those that suffer from hoarding. A recent study showed that people suffering from hoarding experienced increased quality of life and less clutter after a six month period of cognitive behavioral therapy. The following is an excerpt of an article from the New York Times that discusses the issue of disorganization and health:

After the holidays, many shoppers load up their carts with storage bins, shelving systems and color-coded containers, all in a resolute quest to get organized for the new year.

The country’s collective desire to clean up is evident in the proliferation of organization-oriented businesses like the Container Store and California Closets. Reality shows like “Mission Organization” on HGTV and “How Clean is Your House?” on Lifetime feed a national obsession to declutter. The magazine Real Simple has even created a $13 special issue on cleaning house.

Getting organized is unquestionably good for both mind and body — reducing risks for falls, helping eliminate germs and making it easier to find things like medicine and exercise gear.

“If you can’t find your sneakers, you aren’t taking a walk,” said Dr. Pamela Peeke, assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of Maryland and the author of “Fit to Live” (Rodale, 2007), which devotes a section to the link between health and organization. “How are you going to shoot a couple of hoops with your son if you can’t even find the basketball?”

But experts say the problem with all this is that many people are going about it in the wrong way. Too often they approach clutter and disorganization as a space problem that can be solved by acquiring bins and organizers.

Measures like these “are based on the concept that this is a house problem,” said David F. Tolin, director of the anxiety disorders center at the Institute of Living in Hartford and an adjunct associate professor of psychiatry at Yale.

“It isn’t a house problem,” he went on. “It’s a person problem. The person needs to fundamentally change their behavior.”

Click here to read the entire article from the New York Times

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